SAT solutions?: The impacts of College Board’s controversial test cancellations in light of COVID-19
BY EMMA HUERTA It’s no lie that the coronavirus pandemic has taken the world by storm. Students have especially been affected as schools remain closed, classes and events turn virtual and days are indefinitely spent at home.  Besides the evident toll COVID-19 has taken on schools and their students,... Read more
Florida is mishandling its prisons in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic
BY JOSEPH STURGEON Since the onset of the coronavirus pandemic, experts have warned that a slew of communities will be disproportionately affected by it. Among these groups is America’s vast prison population. For decades, the presumed land of the free has specialized in holding people captive. Now, in the... Read more
Quarantine’s effect on the mind: How self isolation and social distancing affect those with mental illness
BY ELENA VALDEZ Staying inside all day and night is routine for many diagnosed with depression or various forms of anxiety disorders. However, as laws become stricter amidst the worldwide lockdown that the dangerous virus COVID-19, or coronavirus, has caused, those suffering from mental illness find it harder to... Read more
Trump’s response to the coronavirus outbreak may harm his aspirations in the 2020 election
BY CHRIS GOMES Almost every president has historically had to tackle a defining crisis during their presidency. President Donald Trump’s defining crisis appears to be the outbreak of the coronavirus, and the way he handles it will shape the outcome of the 2020 election. Generally, in times of national... Read more
Only 200 tries later: U.S. House finally makes lynching a federal crime, 65 years after the murder of Emmett Till
BY EMMA HUERTA On February 26, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a monumental bill to support racial equality. Bill H.R. 35, more commonly known as the Emmett Till Antilynching Act, has now made lynching a hate crime under federal law. It was named in honor of Emmett Till,... Read more
The first step into adulthood: Getting a job
BY ELENA VALDEZ Working is an unavoidable part of life, even if one takes up an obscure or dream job, it is still work. The introduction into this process often begins in later high school years, as students seek out part-time employment alongside school for a number of reasons. ... Read more
Stick to the book: AP Classroom doesn’t belong in the actual classroom
BY SASHEEN JOSEPH When people think of the College Board, thoughts about the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or Advanced Placement (AP) classes usually follow. But an Urban Dictionary user defined the College Board as “ ruin the lives of all high schoolers, especially in the United States... Read more
The fear of being basic: Why won’t the internet let girls be happy?
BY GENNA NORDLING The dictionary definition of the word “basic” is “of, relating to or forming the base or essence; fundamental.” When you Google “basic,” the Urban Dictionary definition is the first result and it is not the same definition. According to Urban Dictionary, “basic” is used to insult... Read more
Must be 18+ to have a right to privacy: New Florida law requiring underage girls to obtain parental consent for an abortion infringes on privacy
BY JULIA SAFRIN Abortions in the U.S. are legal during up to 20 weeks of pregnancy. States, however, can pass their own laws to put restrictions on abortions. The Supreme Court’s Roe v. Wade ruling has never not been controversial, especially in today’s age, where political beliefs and ideologies... Read more
The SAT prep struggle: Students who cannot afford SAT prep courses are at a disadvantage
BY ARIELLE KRAUS One of the most stressful parts of an individual’s junior year of high school is the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT). For most of one’s entire high school experience, they hear about the SAT and worry about how they will do when their time to take it... Read more